The Internet – Following the Pattern of the Future

Some people would like to say that life is one big surprise party. You’ll never guess what you’ll get until you open the door. However, not all things in life come as surprises. There are some that were planned, patterned, and molded. One amazing example is the Internet.

Back when I was still a kid, I’ve watched science fiction movies where characters traveling in space would suddenly get a video transmission of their allies from a different planet. I’d usually ask my father if the television show was real; he’d just laugh and pat my head. Skip twenty five years later and now, we have Skype, Yahoo Messenger, and Google Hangouts.

It’s kind of amazing how the Internet evolved. My earliest memories of ever using the Internet was way back in 1999. I was learning how to use the email. Everyone thought that the Internet was something that was thought of back in the late 80’s and was now implemented in the 90’s. However, the concept of having a “World Wide Web” already existed in 1962.

A certain J.C.R Licklider from MIT produced a series of memos in August of 1962 where he described his “World Network” concept. He envisioned a world where computers were interconnected and everyone would be able to access data from any site in the world. If you think about it, the whole pattern does remind you of the Internet, right?

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In order to make his vision a reality, Mr. Licklider became the first head of the computer research program in DARPA in October 1962. However, a year before Licklider thought of the World Wide Web, Leonard Kleinrock have already published his first paper on packet switching theory. For all computer and Internet geeks out there, yes, he was already researching about data packets. Kleinrock then convinced his friend, Lawrence G. Roberts that it is possible for two computers to “communicate” via packets instead of circuits. Roberts was a good friend of Licklider, therefore he worked with Thomas Merill in 1965 to connect the TX-2 computer in Massachusetts to the Q-32 computer in California using a low speed dial-up telephone line. This became the first ever wide-area computer network ever built.

That was also the first ever dial-up connection. You could say that the event was the one that spawned all other Internet connections that we know today. Kleinrock, Licklider, and Roberts would become the pioneers of the Internet and more collaborations from other networking experts improved the way data packets were sent from one computer to the other. It wasn’t until the late 1970’s that the research community became very interested with the Internet, due to its rapid growth in the past few years. In the early 1980’s, dozens of vendors have expressed interest in developing commercial products for implementing Internet technology. A lot of vendors at that time have started using TCP/IP in their products.

Then in 1995, the FNC unanimously passed a resolution the defined the word “Internet”.

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Breaking Stereotypes and Standing Out

Stereotypes are nothing more but the idea that people get from a certain group because of the pattern in behavior, action, and preference.

Image Credit: geekwire.com

Image Credit: geekwire.com

Geeks are people with glasses, freckles, braces, and are walking encyclopedias and calculators who are already in the borderline of insanity. At least that is what the pattern shows and it is what people are lead to believe is true or near reality. They are also called nerds, brainiacs, etc.

Another stereotype familiar to everyone is that blondes are dumb. This stereotype could really hurt people and this is not true altogether.

As to how these stereotypes started, I really could not tell. Just that most of the time, stereotypes are quite mean and insulting, and if you are someone who can’t take these kinds of things lightly, and you somehow have been stereotyped, then you will really have a difficult time handling your emotions and you might end up in a fight with other people, because really, stereotypes will continue to exist because human behavior patterns exist. As much as we want to deviate from the norm and be unique, there will still be an aspect of life that will fall into a pattern that can be associated with a stereotype.

Another form of stereotyping is by judging people even before meeting them, depending on their work. An example of this is how people stereotype chefs to be fat people. When someone is asked to think of a chef, the picture that comes into mind is that of a fat, round man or woman in a chef’s hat and uniform, slicing away the potatoes or shouting orders at their second in command, grumpy-looking and with casual burns here and there.

Image Credit: wellandgood.com

Image Credit: wellandgood.com

People think that because chefs do nothing all day but cook and taste food and look at food and be surrounded by food, that they would, without a choice, be fat. Food is a chef’s life and therefore it is inevitable to end up eating round the clock.

Apparently, while there is no harm in loving food, there is harm in being fat. This harm, can be physical(because fat can cause diseases in the body, not necessarily physical harm from other people), or it can be emotional, which is the case when being stereotyped. You do not get the chance to prove them wrong. No matter how you convince someone that they are wrong, another person would come along and judge you for the same thing. It would be futile to convince everyone because it would be difficult to reach everyone.

These patterns in life are what helped form the society we live in today. Seeing pattern in things is a good thing. However, like most things, it also tends to lead us to see patterns that are of negative effect. It is up to us to make sure that we do not get easily hurt when we are categorized in a pattern. After all, we should know ourselves better than anyone else and if we are confident about who we really are, stereotype or no stereotype, we will not be easily offended and we can live and enjoy life regardless of what others have to say.